June 3: 4 Common Diet and Nutrition Myths Debunked

When it comes to what you should or shouldn’t eat, there’s no shortage of information available— not to mention differing opinions. So, in an effort to help clear up some of the confusion, here are a few of the more common diet and nutrition myths, debunked.

 

MYTH 1: CONSUMING ENOUGH VITAMIN C WILL PREVENT COLDS.

While taking a vitamin C may reduce the severity or shorten the duration of a cold, it’s unlikely to prevent the illness. Rather than relying on supplements, eat vitamin C-rich foods, such as peppers, citrus fruits, dark leafy greens, broccoli, strawberries and most other fruit.

 

MYTH 2: FROZEN VEGGIES ARE LESS NUTRITIOUS THAN FRESH ONES.

When it comes to fruits and vegetables, it’s less important how we eat them and more important that we eat them. Only a few nutrients are inactivated when frozen, and only some are destroyed when cooked. But these details are insignificant when compared with the numerous benefits that come from eating more fruits and veggies every day.

 

MYTH 3: SEVERAL SMALL MEALS ARE BETTER THAN THREE LARGE ONES.

What we eat is far more important than how often we eat. Whether you eat six small meals or two large ones, the best thing you can do for your health is to make sure they are centered on whole, unprocessed, healthy foods.

 

MYTH 4: EATING FAT WILL MAKE YOU FAT.

There are plenty of people who are scared of fat, thanks to the popular fat-free or low-fat diet trends from the ‘80s and ‘90s. However, fat benefits our bodies by protecting organs, maintaining cell membranes, promoting growth and development, and absorbing essential vitamins. Be sure to choose healthy, unsaturated fats found in olive and canola oil, nuts and avocados rather than saturated and trans fats often found in fatty meats and certain dairy products.

 

 

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